Timber Tax Classification

A Timber Management Plan can help get you in the right tax allocation

How we can help you

Why would the state encourage putting land in a lower tax bracket, thereby reducing revenue?

Washington State encourages sound forestry practices so that present and future generations can enjoy the many benefits they provide. In addition to scenic and recreational spaces, healthy forests provide: an enhanced water supply, reduced soil erosion/flood damage, habitat for wild game, employment opportunities, & raw materials for products.
Timber Tax Classification for NE Washington
Lower your taxes with proper timber designations
Landowners may choose to have their land designated as forest land. This designation often results in a lower assessed value and lower taxes. Contact us today to learn more about these tax allocations.

Requirements for Designated Forest Land

  • Must be used primarily for growing and harvesting timber.
  • Must consist of a single parcel of 5 or more acres; or multiple, contiguous parcels totaling 5 or more acres. (Residential home sites are not included in the 5 acre minimum.)
  • Designated forest land may include land used for incidental uses that are compatible with growing and harvesting timber, but no more than ten percent of the land may be used for such incidental uses.
  • If the land has appurtenances necessary for the production, preparation, or sale of the timber products, that land may also be included.
  • Owner must comply with forest practice laws and regulations.
Application, which must include a Timber Management Plan, must be made to the county assessor.

A Timber Management Plan will include the following:

  1. The legal description of the land, including the assessor’s parcel number.
  2. The date (or dates) of the land acquisition
  3. A statement that the land has the same ownership, consists of contiguous acreage, and is primarily devoted and used to grow and harvest timber.
  4. A brief description of the timber (major species, size, age and condition).
  5. If the timber has been harvested, describe the plans for reforestation. If the land has no trees presently growing on it, describe the plans to restock within 3 years of designation.
  6. A description of past and present livestock grazing on the land.
  7. A description of whether the land is in compliance with the stocking requirements including the number of trees per acre, planned forest management activities (thinning, harvest, brush control), fire protection efforts, insect and disease control, and weed control and forest debris abatement provisions of the Washington Forest Practices Act Title 76 RCW.
  8. A statement indicating whether the land is subject to forest fire protection assessments pursuant to RCW 76.04.610.
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a) Goals – describe the ownership goals for the land and provide an outline of the intended management of the land.
b) Forest types and stands – provide an inventory of the timber by forest type including stocking levels and forest health conditions.
c) Resource inventory and environmental impact considerations – describe the types and species of plants and animals, predominant habitats, wetlands, any endangered species, and aesthetic resources present on the land.
d) A map or aerial photo showing the property lines, access roads, topography, water or other physical features of the property.
e) A statement acknowledging that the owner is aware of the potential tax liability involved when the land ceases to be classified as Timber Land or Designated Forest Land.

Generally, an approved Forest Stewardship Plan as part of the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Forest Stewardship Program will meet the requirements for a Timber Management Plan.

  • A legal description of, or assessor’s parcel numbers for, all land you want designated as forest land. The date or dates of acquisition of the land.
  • A brief description of the timber on the land, or if the timber has been harvested, your plan for restocking.
  • If one exists, a copy of the timber management plan for the land, prepared by a forester or a person with adequate knowledge of timber management practices.
  • If a timber management plan exists, an explanation of the extent to which the management plan has been implemented.
  • Whether the land is used for grazing.
  • Whether the land has been subdivided or a plat has been filed with respect to the land.
  • Whether the land is managed in compliance with the restocking, forest management, fire protection, insect and disease control, and forest debris provisions of Title 76 RCW or any applicable rules under Title 76 RCW.
  • Whether the land is subject to forest fire protection assessments under RCW 76.04.610.
  • Whether the land is subject to a lease, option, or other right that permits it to be used for any purpose other than growing and
    harvesting timber.
  • A summary of your past and current experience growing and harvesting timber.
  • A statement that you are aware of the potential tax liability involved when the land is no longer designated as forest land.
  • An affirmation that the statements contained in the application are true and that the land described in the application meets the
    definition of forest land in RCW 84.33.035.
  • A description and/or map showing what areas of the land are used for incidental uses compatible with the definition of forest land in RCW 84.33.035.

IN SUMMARY: It’s a lot, but we can help you through the process.

  • A legal description of, or assessor’s parcel numbers for, all land you want designated as forest land. The date or dates of acquisition of the land.
  • A brief description of the timber on the land, or if the timber has been harvested, your plan for restocking.
  • If one exists, a copy of the timber management plan for the land, prepared by a forester or a person with adequate knowledge of timber management practices.
  • If a timber management plan exists, an explanation of the extent to which the management plan has been implemented.
  • Whether the land is used for grazing.
  • Whether the land has been subdivided or a plat has been filed with respect to the land.
  • Whether the land is managed in compliance with the restocking, forest management, fire protection, insect and disease control, and forest debris provisions of Title 76 RCW or any applicable rules under Title 76 RCW.
  • Whether the land is subject to forest fire protection assessments under RCW 76.04.610.
  • Whether the land is subject to a lease, option, or other right that permits it to be used for any purpose other than growing and harvesting timber.
  • A summary of your past and current experience growing and harvesting timber.
  • A statement that you are aware of the potential tax liability involved when the land is no longer designated as forest land.
  • An affirmation that the statements contained in the application are true and that the land described in the application meets the definition of forest land in RCW 84.33.035.
  • A description and/or map showing what areas of the land are used for incidental uses compatible with the definition of forest land in RCW 84.33.035.

IN SUMMARY: It’s a lot, but we can help you through the process.

We can change your timberland tax classification for Ferry, Stevens & Pend Oreille county.

For additional information, go here:

Map of Ferry, Stevens & Pend Oreille County - showing cities of Republic, Danville, Kettle Falls, Northport, Evans, Colville, Chewelah, Valley, Springdale, Loon Lake, Hunters, Gifford, Metaline Falls, Ione, Cusick, Usk, Newport, Kalispel

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